Zyliss Herb Mill

Guacamole: It’s that easy

I’m not going to say that “Guacamole is like sex, even when it’s bad, it’s good.” Because it isn’t.  There’s lots of bad guac… but it’s pretty simple overall to make a pretty good guacamole, whether you like it smooth, or full of crunchy bits, rich, spicy…

I like mine pretty simple.  Smooth, spicy, with lots of lime and cilantro. 

For each 1 avocado
juice of 1/2 lime
pinch of salt (more if you’re using it on burgers, tacos, etc. but less if eating it with salted chips)
several sprigs of cilantro
1 chipotle chile in adobo

  1. With a large knife, make a cut from the top to the bottom, going all the way around the pit. Separate the two halves and scoop out the flesh with a large spoon. Removing the pit is a slippery job, I’m not going to recommend any method that could result in loss of fingers.
  2. Mince the chile finely
  3. Mince the cilantro finely
  4. Mix everything together, mashing it until smooth as you like it.

No onion or garlic (they’re in the adobo sauce). No bell pepper (does nothing but add crunch: that’s what the chips are for), no sour cream (you get all your richness from a good avocado). No tomato (add salsa to what you’re eating, separately).

What do you do with the rest of the can of chipotle chiles?  Spread each chile with some adobo on a sheet of waxed or parchment paper, then roll it up and stick it in a freezer bag in the freezer.  They mince pretty well even when frozen.

I mince my cilantro and other sturdy herbs such as oregano in this Zyliss herb mill.  I wouldn’t dare use it for basil.

Zyliss Herb Mill

Sorry, no pics of the finished product — it’s two days old, and pretty green (lime and cilantro each help in their own way), but it’s not that pretty anymore.

clams

Bachelor Chow: Clams in Black Bean Sauce

Where has he been for the last month? Still eating, still cooking, just not taking pictures (my tablet was in the shop, there was a business trip, (“…a fire, a terrible flood, IT’S NOT MY FAULT!”). Anyway, after the disappointing Thai clams, I thought I’d go back to Cantonese basics. This recipe is based on Barbara Tropp’s “China Moon Cookbook.”

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clams with basil and chile jam

Bachelor Chow: Clams with Egg Noodles and Chile Jam from “Simple Thai Food”

I feel like I’m starting to get in a rut: Sue’s out for the evening, it’s time for Asian seafood. Clams with chile jam, egg noodles and basil, while tasty, did not come out quite as awesome as it sounded.

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Tiger Cry Beef

Tiger Cry Beef – from “Simple Thai Food” by Leela Punyaratabandhu

Last week, a beautiful new cookbook arrived, authored by fellow Chicago-area cook Leela Punyaratabandhu. You may know her better as “SheSimmers” – a blog on home Thai cooking. The day I received it, I made a batch of Panang (Phanaeng) Curry, which I didn’t photograph, and last night a batch of Tiger Cry Beef. There’s no doubt in my mind that this book is a winner. Continue reading

Pasta with Morels, Chard and Gorgonzola

Morel Season Part 1: Bachelor Chow Pasta

Every year, my brother hunts morels. I can’t tell you where he finds them, he won’t even tell me. But he’ll share them… when there’s more than his household can consume, and his younger daughter is a fiend for them floured and fried.  This year, I got a couple pounds, and with Sue out for a Mothers’ Day Eve Girls Night Out, it’s back to Bachelor Chow again.

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greens and cheese empanadas

Happy Cinco de Mayo – Empañadas Two Ways

We hosted an early Cinco de Mayo party at our house last night with three other couples: guacamole, flan, tamales and chiles rellenos were brought, and we made (another) flan and empañadas. I made two fillings — a traditional picadillo made from beef, and a greens and cheese one — the latter mainly because we have a vegetarian in our dinner group, but they came out very tasty.

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finished dish

Bachelor Chow Weekend: Chimney-Seared Tuna

Sue’s gone for the weekend, so expect several bachelor chow posts, starting with last night’s dinner.  Saku (yellowfin) tuna was available at the newly-opened Fresh Thyme market at a decent price.

So how to prepare it? Seared tuna is somewhat passe, but the only other method that sounded interesting would be oil-poached, and I thought I should keep at least one meal this weekend light.

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