Zyliss Herb Mill

Guacamole: It’s that easy

I’m not going to say that “Guacamole is like sex, even when it’s bad, it’s good.” Because it isn’t.  There’s lots of bad guac… but it’s pretty simple overall to make a pretty good guacamole, whether you like it smooth, or full of crunchy bits, rich, spicy…

I like mine pretty simple.  Smooth, spicy, with lots of lime and cilantro. 

For each 1 avocado
juice of 1/2 lime
pinch of salt (more if you’re using it on burgers, tacos, etc. but less if eating it with salted chips)
several sprigs of cilantro
1 chipotle chile in adobo

  1. With a large knife, make a cut from the top to the bottom, going all the way around the pit. Separate the two halves and scoop out the flesh with a large spoon. Removing the pit is a slippery job, I’m not going to recommend any method that could result in loss of fingers.
  2. Mince the chile finely
  3. Mince the cilantro finely
  4. Mix everything together, mashing it until smooth as you like it.

No onion or garlic (they’re in the adobo sauce). No bell pepper (does nothing but add crunch: that’s what the chips are for), no sour cream (you get all your richness from a good avocado). No tomato (add salsa to what you’re eating, separately).

What do you do with the rest of the can of chipotle chiles?  Spread each chile with some adobo on a sheet of waxed or parchment paper, then roll it up and stick it in a freezer bag in the freezer.  They mince pretty well even when frozen.

I mince my cilantro and other sturdy herbs such as oregano in this Zyliss herb mill.  I wouldn’t dare use it for basil.

Zyliss Herb Mill

Sorry, no pics of the finished product — it’s two days old, and pretty green (lime and cilantro each help in their own way), but it’s not that pretty anymore.

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Recipe Makeover: Shrimp with Turmeric and Kaffir Lime Leaves

My Kaffir Lime tree (best xmas present ever) has gotten a little leggy, so it was time to prune it back. So what can I do with a few leaves on a weeknight?  I feel like making a curry or tom yam soup, so I hit the Google. I have some frozen shrimp, and some about-to-bolt lettuce in the garden, so what could I do for a light meal with what I had?

I came up with two recipes: One from Ming Tsai which sounded simple but perhaps not very adventurous, and one from a spice company that added a couple more flavors in that sounded like they’d work together well. I then kicked it up a little bit (neither recipe used fish sauce? no garlic?), making the flavors closer to tom som (green papaya salad). This made a nice light meal for two, with a little left over for lunch.

Sorry, no photos today — we ate it too quickly.

Recipe: Shrimp with Turmeric and Kaffir Lime Leaves

12 oz (340g) frozen shrimp, thawed, peeled, deveined
1 large clove garlic, minced
1/2 medium onion, sliced
1/2 to 1 jalapeno chile, sliced into rings
2 full (double) kaffir lime leaves, center vein removed and shredded
1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) turmeric
a few grinds of black pepper
juice of 2 limes
1 Tbs fish sauce

3 cups leaf lettuce, cleaned and cut into bite-sized pieces
1/2 cup shredded carrot
1/3 cup scallions, sliced into fine rings
juice of 1.5 limes
2 Tbs (30ml) olive oil
large pinch of sugar
pinch of salt and a few more grinds of pepper
2 full (double) kaffir lime leaves, center vein removed and minced

  1. Combine the shrimp, onion, chile, shredded leaves, turmeric, pepper, the juice of two limes and fish sauce in a nonreactive bowl and marinate for ten minutes.
  2. While the shrimp marinate, prepare the salad using the rest of the ingredients.  Toss to mix flavors
  3. Heat a large nonstick pan on medium-high heat with the oil
  4. Drain and discard any liquid from the marinading bowl, and add everything but the shrimp to the hot pan, stir fry until the onions have softened just a bit (a minute or so)
  5. Add the shrimp and continue to stir fry until they are opaque
  6. Remove from heat
  7. Distribute the salad on plates, top with the cooked shrimp/onion/chile

 

Bachelor Chow: Clams in Black Bean Sauce

Where has he been for the last month? Still eating, still cooking, just not taking pictures (my tablet was in the shop, there was a business trip, (“…a fire, a terrible flood, IT’S NOT MY FAULT!”). Anyway, after the disappointing Thai clams, I thought I’d go back to Cantonese basics. This recipe is based on Barbara Tropp’s “China Moon Cookbook.”

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